Desktop Ram Vs Laptop Ram – Complete Guide

When buying a new computer, one of the most important factors to consider is how much RAM it has. The Ram provides the computer with the much-needed Random Access Memory, which is where data is stored for quick access by the processor. Desktop computers and laptop computers use different types of RAM. But what’s the difference between desktop and laptop RAM? And does it really matter which type you choose? Here, we’ll take a closer look at desktop and laptop RAM and explain why you might want to opt for desktop RAM if you can.

What Are The Differences Between Desktop Ram And Laptop Ram?

There are seven primary differences between desktop and laptop RAM:

  • Desktop RAM is often dual-channel, whereas laptop RAM is usually single-channel. This means that for desktop systems, two memory modules are installed in the system, one in each of the two memory channels. This allows for better performance as data can be accessed more quickly. For laptop systems, only a single module is usually installed, resulting in slower performance.
  • Desktop RAM is almost always faster than laptop RAM. This is because laptop RAM has to cope with additional factors such as battery life and temperature fluctuations which desktop memory doesn’t have to worry about.
  • Desktop RAM typically comes in larger capacities than laptop memory does. For example, you can find 8GB Desktop RAM modules, but it’s rare to find anything larger than 4GB in a laptop.
  • Desktop memory is cheaper per gigabyte than laptop memory. Because of this, it’s often more cost-effective to upgrade the RAM in a desktop PC than it is to do so in a laptop.
  • Laptop RAM is often low-voltage, meaning that it uses less power and results in longer battery life for your laptop. It also generates less heat, meaning your laptop won’t get as hot when running on low-voltage RAM.
  • Desktop RAM is typically ECC (Error Correcting Code) memory, which means that it can detect and correct errors in data. Laptop RAM is usually non-ECC, which means that it can’t correct errors and is more likely to experience data corruption.
  • Desktop RAM is usually unbuffered, meaning that it doesn’t have a buffer between the memory controller and the module. Laptop RAM is typically buffered, meaning a buffer exists between the memory controller and the module. This helps to improve reliability and stability, but it comes at the expense of slightly slower performance.

What Are The Similarities Between Desktop Ram And Laptop Ram?

The similarities between desktop RAM and laptop RAM are given below:

  • Both desktop and laptop RAM are designed to store data temporarily while the computer is in use.
  • The two types of RAM have the same basic function – to provide a platform for the processor to interact with other hardware components in the system.
  • Desktop and laptop RAM modules usually have the same dimensions, although there can be small variations from one type of module to another.
  • The speed at which desktop and laptop RAM can operate is typically the same.
  • One key difference between desktop and laptop RAM is that laptop modules generally include a thermal sensor, which helps keep them cool during operation.

How To Choose the right Ram For Your Desktop or Laptop?

There are many things to look for when choosing a new RAM module for your desktop or laptop:

Compatibility:

The first and most important thing to check is whether the RAM is compatible with your computer. Check the specs of your system or motherboard to see what type of RAM it uses (DDR, DDR2, etc.), and then make sure the new module is of that type.

Size:

The next thing to consider is the module size. Most desktop systems will use DIMMs (Dual Inline Memory Modules) in either 240-pin or 184-pin sizes, while laptop systems will use SODIMMs (Small Outline DIMMs) in either 200-pin or 204-pin sizes. Again, check your system specs to see which size you need.

Speed:

RAM speed is measured in MHz, and the best way to find out what speed your system supports is to check the motherboard or system specs. The most common speeds for DDR2 and DDR3 modules are 800 MHz, 1066 MHz, and 1200 MHz.

Latency:

Latency is the time it takes for the RAM to respond to a request from the CPU. It’s measured in nanoseconds (ns), and the lower the number, the better. Again, consult your motherboard or system specs to see what latency is supported.

Voltage:

RAM voltage is usually 1.8V for DDR2 and DDR3 modules. Some high-end RAM modules may require 2.0V or even 2.1V, so check the specs before buying.

Capacity:

The capacity of a RAM module is measured in megabytes (MB), and the most common sizes are 512 MB, 1 GB, and 2 GB. Some high-end modules can be 4 GB or even 8 GB, but these are usually only necessary for gamers or power users.

Price:

Of course, price is always a factor when choosing any computer component. RAM prices have decreased significantly in recent years, so it’s easy to find a good quality module at a reasonable price. Just be sure to compare apples to apples by looking at each module’s specs to ensure you’re getting what you need.

Conclusion:

So, is a desktop worth the extra money for more RAM? In most cases, yes. A desktop with a larger amount of RAM will perform better than a laptop with the same amount of RAM due to the difference in architecture. If you are looking for a computer that can handle high-end gaming or video editing, then you will need to invest in a desktop with enough RAM to meet your needs. However, if you are just using your computer for basic tasks such as web browsing and word processing, then a laptop with 4-8GB of RAM should be sufficient.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is It Worth It to Get Desktop Ram for Your Laptop?

The simple answer is no. Laptop RAM is designed to be low power and low profile so that it won’t fit in a desktop computer. Even if you could make it fit, the performance would be poor because Desktop RAM uses different voltages than laptop RAM.


Share post on
Chris Slambery
By Chris Slambery

Chris Slambery is the founder of Gamingerra, a website devoted to technology and gaming. He's been passionate about both subjects since he was a child, and has been working in tech journalism for over a decade. When Chris isn't writing or gaming, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two young children. Chris loves keeping up to date with the latest tech news and he wants to share that information with as many people as possible. He's always been fascinated by the latest technologies and loves sharing his knowledge with others.


Gaming Erra is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Which Type Of Cpu Cooler Contains Heat Pipes? Pro Guide Learning Guides

Which Type Of Cpu Cooler Contains Heat Pipes? Pro Guide

Cpu coolers are an important part of any computer system. There are many types...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How To Check Your Monitors Resolution? Simple Guide Learning Guides

How To Check Your Monitors Resolution? Simple Guide

One of the most important things to check before you start graphic designing or...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Do You Have To Reinstall Windows With A New Motherboard? Learning Guides

Do You Have To Reinstall Windows With A New Motherboard?

Reinstalling windows with a new motherboard is unnecessary unless you have hardware issues or...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How To Use A Keyboard And Mouse On Xbox One Without an Adapter? Learning Guides

How To Use A Keyboard And Mouse On Xbox One Without an Adapter?

Did you know that you can use a keyboard and mouse on Xbox One...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How To Clean Thermal Paste Off Processor? Pro Guide Learning Guides

How To Clean Thermal Paste Off Processor? Pro Guide

Thermal paste is a conductive agent that is applied to the surface of a...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How To Connect Two Monitors To Macbook Pro? Pro Guide Learning Guides

How To Connect Two Monitors To Macbook Pro? Pro Guide

The Macbook Pro is known for its great design and powerful performance. But did...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Ps Vita Could Not Connect To Pc? Comprehensive Guide Learning Guides

Ps Vita Could Not Connect To Pc? Comprehensive Guide

The PlayStation Vita has been out for a few years now, and while it...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How To Remove Heatsink From Cpu? Complete Guide Learning Guides

How To Remove Heatsink From Cpu? Complete Guide

Do you need to remove the heatsink from your CPU? Maybe you're having a...

By Chris Slambery
Updated

Latest Posts

How To Fix Warzone Keeps Restarting? – Recommended Guide Buying Guides

How To Fix Warzone Keeps Restarting? – Recommended Guide

Warzone is a popular game mode in Halo 5: Guardians. Many players enjoy playing...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Do Monitors Have Speakers? – Complete Guide Buying Guides

Do Monitors Have Speakers? – Complete Guide

Are you looking for a new monitor to buy and wondering if it has...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Cpu Fan Error Asus – With Tips And Tricks Buying Guides

Cpu Fan Error Asus – With Tips And Tricks

If you're a PC gamer, then you're no doubt familiar with the dreaded "CPU...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Intel 13th Gen Release Date – Simple Guide Buying Guides

Intel 13th Gen Release Date – Simple Guide

Intel has recently revealed the Intel 13th Generation of their processor lineup and the...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Buying Guides

How To Unlock Keyboard On Dell Laptop? – Pro Tips

Dell laptops are a popular choice for people who are looking for a quality...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
What Graphics Card Do I Have? – Recommended Guide Buying Guides

What Graphics Card Do I Have? – Recommended Guide

If you're a PC gamer, then you know that having a good graphics card...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
Best Fan Controller Software – Latest Guide Buying Guides

Best Fan Controller Software – Latest Guide

Anyone who has ever tried to control the fan on their computer knows that...

By Chris Slambery
Updated
How Do I Check My Computer For Windows 10 Compatibility? Buying Guides

How Do I Check My Computer For Windows 10 Compatibility?

Microsoft has been hard at work on the next version of Windows, code-named Windows...

By Chris Slambery
Updated