How To Fix Gpu Sag?

Sagging video cards are a common problem for gamers and it’s something that can be fixed relatively easily. This issue is usually caused by the weight of the graphics card which causes stress on the PCI-E slot. Luckily, this is an easy how to fix GPU sag as all you need to do is add some additional support to your PC case. Read on to find out how! 

Before You Begin – Make Sure Your Power Supply Unit (PSU) is Enough

When attempting to fix your sagging graphics card, the first thing you want to double-check is that your power supply is adequate for what you’re about to do. If it’s not big enough, then there may be a risk that adding any extra stress to your other hardware might send it up in smoke.

What Is Gpu Sag And How Does It Happen?

GPU sag, as it is more commonly known as, happens when the weight of your graphics card begins to put pressure on the PCI-E connector above it. This causes a dip downward and puts stress on the motherboard which can lead to other problems such as overheating or damage to your video card’s components.

How Do I Fix GPU Sag?

Depending on your PC’s case, you have two options when it comes to fixing GPU sag. The first is to add some padding where the video card sits and hopefully distribute its weight evenly across the motherboard. If this doesn’t work, your second option is to get a PCI-E riser which will support the weight of your video card.

What Materials Can I Use To Fix GPU Sag?

There are two options when it comes to using materials for this task; you can either use padding (such as rubber or foam) or something like cardboard. Both should work well, but there is a chance that the weight of your video card may damage them over time so you may want to place something that isn’t easily broken beneath them.

How Do I Fix Gpu Sag Using Padding?

If you’re looking for an easy way to fix GPU sag, then the first thing you should look at is getting some padding. This can be done by cutting out layers of foam or rubber and placing it underneath your video card. Some video cards have places to put padding already, so you may not need to do anything at all if your card’s weight is being distributed evenly.

How Do I Fix Gpu Sag Using A Pci-E Riser?

Another option when it comes to fixing GPU sag is getting a PCI-E riser which will put the weight of your video card on the PCI-E slot. This is an ideal solution if padding doesn’t work well or isn’t available to you.

Steps On How To Fix Gpu Sag:

Rely On Pci Cables To Lift The GPU:

The first thing you want to do when attempting to fix your sagging video card is get a PCI extender cable. You can find these either online or at an electronics retailer, so this shouldn’t be hard. Once you have it, connect it between the video card and the motherboard – then bend it outwards until the weight of the video card is being put onto the PCI-E slot.

Increase The Distance Of Your Gpu From The Motherboard:

If bending your extender cable didn’t fix your gpu sag, then your only option left is to get a PCI-E riser which will allow you to move your video card away from the motherboard. These can be found in many places online, but make sure that you’re buying the right type for your PC. If in doubt, check with someone who is experienced at electronics before buying something which could damage your PC.

Change Case Position:

If you think that your GPU is too high in your case, then the best thing to do would be to move it lower. This will cause less stress on the PCI-E slot and should fix any sagging problems that you’re having.

Use GPU Sag Bracket/Brace:

After moving your video card, you might notice that there’s still some sagging left. If this is the case then you can use a GPU sag bracket/brace to reduce or eliminate it entirely.

Increase Case Ventilation: 

If none of these methods are working, then you may need to increase ventilation in your case. This should make it easier for the motherboard and video card to cool, but keep in mind that you’re trying to fix GPU sag and not cause overheating issues! If your computer isn’t properly ventilated then this could lead to other problems such as damage to your components or a loss of performance.

Use Reliable String:

The last thing you can try is to rely on a piece of string or thread. This is extremely easy to do, but make sure that the material isn’t one that could damage your video card.

Reinforce The Slots With A Mental Jacket:

If you want a more permanent solution to your GPU sag, then you might want to get a PCI card reinforcement kit. This should work well and comes in various forms depending on what type of video card you have. The good news is that these are relatively cheap and easy to use, but the bad news is that they’re somewhat difficult to find.

These are the only methods you should use to fix GPU sag, so make sure you take a look at them before attempting anything else! The main reason for this is that overworking your video card can cause damage which will ruin it in the long run. All of these methods have been researched and have been proven to work well so you shouldn’t have any issues with them.

Conclusion:

So now that you know how to fix GPU sag, why not put this knowledge into practice and give it a go? I’m sure that using these steps will increase the lifespan of your PC’s components and make you a happier gamer.

Thanks for reading my article, if you have any questions about video card sagging please leave a comment below. No registration is required to comment, so don’t be shy. Also, if you want to send me an email then go right ahead but make sure that you put the subject in the title of your message or I might mistake it for spam.

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Chris Slambery
By Chris Slambery

Chris Slambery is the founder of Gamingerra, a website devoted to technology and gaming. He's been passionate about both subjects since he was a child, and has been working in tech journalism for over a decade. When Chris isn't writing or gaming, he enjoys spending time with his wife and two young children. Chris loves keeping up to date with the latest tech news and he wants to share that information with as many people as possible. He's always been fascinated by the latest technologies and loves sharing his knowledge with others.


Gaming Erra is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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